Episode 21: Disability and Depression

The silhouette of a man looking out a window with his hand across his forehead, as if having depression.

In this episode, we talk about disability and depression. We know it’s not the most pleasant topic. But, we wouldn’t be keeping it real if we acted like life is sunshine and roses all the time. And let’s be honest, depression is one of the realest parts of the human experience for so many. A transcript for this episode can be found here. This transcript is due to our generous supporters on Patreon. Thank you.

Why is it important to be open about disability and depression?

Here’s the problem: far too often, people assume that if a disabled person is depressed, the disability must be the direct cause. Even more problematic is that these kinds of assumptions aren’t just made by friends or family, but also by medical professionals.

It’s true that there can be a strong correlation between disability and depression. But it’s important to remember that people can be depressed for any number of reasons.

That said, it’s also important to recognize when disability is contributing to depression, and acknowledge that these feelings are valid. We’ve both encountered this. For instance, we’ve come face to face with physical limitations caused by our disabilities. We’ve had to grapple with things we can’t do. Experiences like this can definitely trigger or amplify emotions, especially for people who are already depressed.

So, we decided to record this episode for three main reasons:

1) To push back against the taboo of mental health disabilities;
2) To explore the connections between being disabled and being depressed;
3) And, most importantly, to let you know that you’re not alone.

Disclaimer: We understand that not everyone considers mental health issues to be disabilities. And we know people use a range of terms to refer to mental health disabilities. For the purposes of this episode, we are defining mental health issues as a category under the umbrella of disability.

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